UK reels from second nerve agent poisonings, Russia denies involvement

Military personnel wearing protective suits remove a police car and other vehicles from a public car park as they continue investigations into the poisoning of Sergei Skripal on March 11, 2018 in Salisbury, England.

Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Military personnel wearing protective suits remove a police car and other vehicles from a public car park as they continue investigations into the poisoning of Sergei Skripal on March 11, 2018 in Salisbury, England.

Michelle Carlin, a toxicologist at Northumbria University in England, said the latest incident is surprising.

“It is difficult to speculate whether this is from the original source used in the Skripal case,” she said in a statement. “If it was from the same source, it is unusual that it has taken four months for someone to be affected by it.

“There are many factors that we are unaware of at this moment, but based on the fact that the agent has been identified quickly and the hospital has successfully treated the Skripals, hopefully the couple will recover well.”

After a second nerve agent poisoning in a quiet part of southern England, the country’s chief medical officer sought to reassure the British public that the risk was low.

The U.K. responded to the Skripals’ poisoning by expelling 23 Russian diplomats. Several of Britain’s international allies followed suit in a show of solidarity. Russia has always denied any involvement in the poisoning, saying the attack was fabricated and an attempt by the U.K. to spread anti-Russian propaganda.

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